Anonymous

Can I stay with native american for a month at the reservation or somewhere that I can learn their culture? (Note : I'm Asian)

I'm 18 years old exchange student from Asia. I have to find some place to stay after the end of semester and I'm interested to know if I want to stay with native american for a month in reservation or somewhere that I can learn their culture, do I have a chance to do that? 
If yes, how can I prepare myself and get some contact with them? 

The reason that I want is because I've studied and fascinated by their culture and belief for a long time since I was a child (now I'm also learning Lakota language from the internet.) And want to get in touch with them in someday if I have a chance. 
In this next mid-year my semester will end and I'm free to stay anywhere in the US. So I want that time to be a chance for me to learn more about the natives. 

I can accept their rules and taboos. I just want to have some experience living with them.

Also I want to know their aspect about Asian people, are the Asians welcomed to them? 

Or you can give me any suggestions about this topic. Thanks.

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4 Answers

Maurice Korvo Profile
Maurice Korvo answered

Check out the Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park

www.blackfootcrossing.ca/index.html

You may be able to contact them and make arrangements. But it is in Canada, not the USA

Bikergirl Anonymous Profile

Just keep in mind these communities differ on many levels .. Like any community anywhere in the world involve some level of dangers and risk. They are not all alike.  Some are managed well and are thriving and the people are proud, self sufficient, well educated and contribute to their community .. Others, well .. Not so much.  Some practice and maintain their culture (at least to an extent), some don't.  I would suggest you do your research before you entertain the idea and choose where to go .. Some are quite dangerous, impoverished and experience a high level of violence, drug, alcohol and substance abuse and all that accompanies that environment.  Very similar to any community where there are safer neighbourhoods to be in and not so safe places to be. 

No place is a undeniable 'safe' place.

Make contact with the department of Aboriginal or First Nations Affairs (or equivalent) depending on where you want to go, and they may best provide you with advise on how to continue with your study.

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