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How Do Humans Affect Ecosystems?

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Natural ecosystems everywhere have been affected by humans, either directly or indirectly. The serious implications of this have become increasingly apparent, and considerable action is required. The new generation will feel the consequences more strongly than anyone previous. Their understanding and involvement is essential from the outset because the repercussions, though not their fault, will most certainly be their problem.
Basic background information for some serious human threats to the living world, and some possible solutions, are outlined below as guidance for teacher-pupil discussions. Only environmental problems that are easily observable and resolvable within Britain have been included. For example, rainforest destruction, though of major importance, has not been described. The problems, in general, are caused by humans altering natural ecosystems, which then affect other ecosystems around the world.
To get the children thinking about the issues, the problems and potential solutions, tell them a few of the things that humans do, e.g. Drop litter, drive cars, farm intensively. What effects do they think these will have on the local ecosystem and more remote ones? What could we do differently to reduce, or eliminate, these problems?
Emphasize roles the children can play themselves. Involve them. They can help to change things by altering what they do, or by telling others about the problems and solutions. Perhaps they could be assisted in writing a letter to the government or local council, saying what they think should be done, asking what is being done and how they can help.

Human alteration of Earth is substantial and growing. Between one-third and one-half of the land surface has been transformed by human action; the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere has increased by nearly 30 percent since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution; more atmospheric nitrogen is fixed by humanity than by all natural terrestrial sources combined; more than half of all accessible surface fresh water is put to use by humanity;and about one-quarter of the bird species on Earth have been driven to extinction. By these and other standards, it is clear that we live on a human-dominated planet.
The earth's ecosystems are complex ecological environments which have developed over billions years. The intricate components of an ecosystem cannot be severely altered because the changes will affect its success. However, humans harm the environment by causing global warming, habitat destruction, acid deposition, and environmental estrogens. The aspects of human interference that we will be covering are the role of acid deposition, the discovery of deformed frogs, and the results of environmental estrogens. Each effect demonstrates the conflict between humans and their surrounding species.

Humans are fully dependent on Earth’s ecosystems and the services that they provide, such as food, clean water, disease regulation, climate regulation, spiritual fulfillment, and aesthetic enjoyment. The relationship between ecosystem services and human well-being is mediated by access to manufactured, human, and social capital. Human well-being depends on ecosystem services but also on the supply and quality of social capital, technology, and institutions. These factors mediate the relationship between ecosystem services and human well-being in ways that remain contested and incompletely understood. The relationship between human well-being and ecosystem services is not linear. When an ecosystem service is abundant relative to the demand, a marginal increase in ecosystem services generally contributes only slightly to human well-being (or may even diminish it). But when the service is relatively scarce, a small decrease can substantially reduce human well-being
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We kill every living thing in the world then we get mad when something/someone hurts us.

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