Why Do We Have An Appendix?

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A human appendix is an appendage of the bowel. Situated in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen, it is attached to the caecum, which is the first part of the large bowel. A normal appendix is around 7 ~ 9 centimetres long, though when inflamed (appendicitis), it can vary significantly from person to person.
Scientists argue of its function, some suggesting that it has no known use in modern humans, but played a role in the digestive system when ancient man ate more roughage, others suggest it has a function in contributing to the immune system as it is high in lymphoid cells.
Appendicitis is a very painful condition, usually requiring surgical intervention; symptoms include pain in the abdomen, fever, nausea, vomiting and a high white blood cell count.
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Anonymous answered
It acts as an good warehouse for bacteria to be stored in and it is its job to reboot the digestive system. The appendix is found underneath the large intestine, under the normal one-way flow of germs and food. It also act as an bacteria factory, cultivating the good ones in the body. This organ, which is about 2-4 inches long in length, plays a role to help the process of digestion and also helps to boost the immune system as it has huge amounts of lymphoid cells.

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