How Are Plants Classified?

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Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
They can be sorted by date & rating
Katie Harry Profile
Katie Harry answered
Jose, there are two main ways in which plants may be classified. Sometimes, they are classified according to their size and complexity. There are the bryophytes which are small in size and have structures that resemble (and perform the functions of) leaves, stems and roots. Then, there are deseminated byspores plants like liverworts and mosses. The most commonly known are the vascular plants. These have fully developed leaves, stems and root systems. These are further divided into two sub categories: Seedless (e.g. Ferns) and seed plants. Seed plants further contain gymnosperms which are plants that do not flower but usually have pines (e.g. Pines and firs) and angiosperms which are flowering plants whose seeds are enclosed within the fruit. Angiosperms may be either dicotyledons or monocotyledons. From these types, the botanists derive 12 divisions that are then divided into classes followed by orders. Orders are divided into families into genera (singular: Genus) and finally into species.
The second way to classify plants is by the binomial system developed by Carolus Linneaus. This contains a plant's name. The name has two parts to it (that's is why it is called 'binomial'): The genus followed by the species. Both these names are Latin (or Latinized). For example, the botanical name for tomato is Solanum lycopersicum; Solanum being the genus and lycopersicum its species name.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
No disrespect katie01 but that is definately not it... Classification was a complex and strange thing before Linnaeus developed his system, and became even stranger and more complex after. Linnaeus was a great champion, and chief reviver, of Gaspard Bauhine's idea of giving all living things two names. Although the theory of binomial nomenclature had been around for almost one hundred years, it took Linnaeus to once again bring the idea forward and combine it with his unique system of sexual identification. Although his system was designed to be simple, basing all flowering plant classification on the number of stamens in the bloom, and requiring the botanist to simply count them to determine which group the plant should be placed in, the complexity of nature was not so easily defined.  Through some translations, styles became wives, and stamens husbands, with their groupings being referred to as a marriage. This resulted in some very strange, and occasionally very funny, descriptions. Despite this peculiar result, in one form or another, Linnaeus' method was the standard for many years to come.  The core of his method was the binomial, or two name, method of classification that he championed, where all living things were given two basic latinized names to determine their relationship to all other living things. Gaspard Bauhine had first proposed this idea in his seminal work Pinax (1623) in which he described over 6000 plants and set out his basic criteria for classification, but it took over one hundred years before Carl Linnaeus resurected the idea.   By combining the binomial method with his (originally) simple method of counting stamens, Linnaeus created a working system of classification that became widely embraced, as it proved on the whole, to be much more practical and flexible than any previous method devised.  There have been a few other methods of classification since the days of Linnaeus, but it would seem that all will soon fall by the wayside, as DNA classification is likely to replace all previous methods. However, the binomial system of applying names will nonetheless remain.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Plants are classified by one group being a group of plants that do not make seeds, the other group does not
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Plants have common characteristic.but each has characteristics that uniquely theirs

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