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Does Your Sense Of Smell Affect Your Sense Of Taste?

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Neil Grayson Profile
Neil Grayson answered
It has been suggested that humans can perceive only four tastes, salty, sweet, sour, bitter, but can recognize thousands of smells which suggest that smell and taste are related. Smell is capable of a much wider variance because it detects actual chemical molecules released into the air, and further refines them by their intensity.

The ability to distinguish various foods relies predominantly on the sense of smell. This explains why foods seem to have little taste for a person who is suffering from a head cold. The taste and smell of appetizing foods prepare the digestive tract for digestion by stimulating the flow of saliva in the mouth and gastric juice in the stomach.

Our chemoreceptor’s used for both taste and smell adapt quickly to any stimulus. The nasal cavity and oral cavity are closely connected, separated only by the palate. So it makes sense that the two senses go hand in hand. 

A hypothesis is a proposed explanation for a phenomenon. For a hypothesis to be put forward as a scientific hypothesis, the scientific method requires that one can test it. Scientists generally base scientific hypotheses on previous observations that cannot satisfactorily be explained with the available scientific theories.       
     
If you believe that smell and taste are related then a possible hypothesis could be, ‘I believe that smell affects the way people perceive taste.’ To successfully test your hypothesis you should carry out some kind of scientific test. A suggested test to establish whether taste and smell are related would be to blocking each sense independently and then test and identify foods. Your results should determine which of the two senses send the clearer message to the brain on what you are eating.        After your hypothesis you should include the Measured Variables, Experimental Groups, Materials, Procedures, Results, which should include a table and your Conclusion.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The senses of smell and taste, two of the five senses identified by Aristotle, are called “chemical senses” and are sometimes regarded as one sense rather than separate senses. About 80% of what we taste is actually due to our sense of smell. Without the sense of smell, we would only be able to recognize five tastes: Sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and savory. A food's flavor can be altered by simply changing its smell, while keeping its taste the same.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Yes, while you are chewing, odor molecules from the ground-up food inside your mouth float upwards, causing your sense of smell and taste to link together and interact.
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Anonymous answered
Your sense of smell does have something to do with the sense of taste because when food goes into your mouth odor molecules from that food travel to the olfactory receptor cells at the top of your nasal cavity just beneath the brain. The odor molecules then send chemical messengers to the brain telling what type of food it is. If mucus is in that Passage becomes to thick then the odor molecules won't be able to reach the olfactory cells and got o the brain.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Yes, your taste and smell depend on . If you are sick and you have a stuffed up nose, then you can barely taste anything. Your sense of smell is a big part of your ability to taste. Your taste buds don't actually taste, they just determine weather something is sweet, sour, bitter, or salty. You taste the food or drink while you are chewing or sipping. I'm a ten year old and I am doing a science project on this. I've done lots of research and I hoped this helped you!!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
75% of taste is contributed by smell. When you have a cold and you've got a stuffed up nose, usually you can't smell anything. Consequently, you usually can't taste anything, either. That's because the odor molecules can't meet up with the sensory receptors in the nose and transmit that information to the brain.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Yes because when you are about to put a piece of food in your mouth you are smelling it and then the smell is sent to your taste buds and knows what it will taste like before it is in your mouth.
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Anonymous answered
Yes because once I gave my friend RICKY MORENO a jelly bean and then he closed his eyes and covered his nose and he said that he couldnt tell what he was eating
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Yes, your ear, nose and throat is linked via a tube which I believe is called a ustation tube. Hope this helps x
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The sense of smell does a very important part in the sense of tast bec uze the odor molecule's can transmitt the brain
Deborah Wacker Profile
Deborah Wacker answered
Your smell has nothing to do with the way you taste different foods. Your taste buds are located on your tongue and the way you smell is through your nose. The Eustachian tube is located at the end of your ear canal. However, you can lose the sense of smell from a problem with the sinus cavities located at the back of your nose over your cheek bones, which also have a little to do with smell. The best thing for you to do is if you are having a problem with this you need to see a ear, nose, and throat Dr.

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