What Are The Physical And Chemical Properties Of Carbon, Diamond, Allotropes, Graphite & Buckminsterfullerene?

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Buckminsterfullerene:

Buckminsterfullerene is actually the smallest fullerene molecule where no two pentagons share an edge. They are from the family of carbon allotrope and are composed entirely of carbon.

     Physical Properties of Buckminsterfullerene:
     - Unique shape.
     - They are resilient to impact and deformation.
     - They pop back to their original shape, if deformed.

   Chemical Properties of Buckminsterfullerene:
   - They are extremely stable in nature.
   - They are inert.
   - They have aromaticity which means they are stable and inert carbon bonds.
   - Soluble in many solvents and are the only carbon allotrope that are soluble.
   - Their hollow structure allows them to hold other atoms inside them.

Graphite:
Graphite is also a carbon allotrope. It is the most stable form of carbon under standard conditions.

   Physical Properties of Graphite:
   - It has a sub-metallic lustre.
   - It is opaque whereby its color ranges from Iron black to steel grey.
   - It is very flexible.
   - It is a good conductor.

   Chemical Properties of Graphite:
   - The carbon atoms in Graphite are arranged in a hexagonal lattice.
   - It is highly anisotropic in nature.
   - It has a loose interlamellar coupling.
   - It forms intercalation compounds with metals and small molecules.

Diamond:
Diamond is also the allotrope of Carbon. The atoms of carbon are arranged in an isometric-hexactahedral crystal lattice.

   Physical Properties of Diamond:
   - Transparent crystal.
   - It is extremely hard.
   - It has a very high dispersion index.
   - It also has a very high thermal conductivity.

   Chemical Properties of Diamond:
   - Diamond is the least compressible and stiff substance.
   - It has a very low thermal expansion.
   - It is chemically inert.
   - It has a negative work function or negative electron affinity that results in its repelling of    
   water and readily accepting wax and grease.

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