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What Happens If You Mix Ammonia And Hydrogen Peroxide?

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Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered

Chemically, the combination of ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with hair results in the production of a number of products. Most commonly water (H20) and oxygen (O2) will be produced as hair shafts are opened up and their pigments oxidised. It is claimed (without noting evidence) that some hydrazine (N2H4) will be produced, a toxic chemical. Since the reaction is exothermic, releasing heat energy, care should be taken when carrying it out in the presence of skin.

A combination of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide is often used in the process of bleaching hair. Hydrogen peroxide has the necessary properties to remove the color from hair - it oxidizes one of hair’s melanin pigments to a colorless substance. This results in the hair becoming lighter. Done time and time again, bleaching can lead to hair becoming a very light platinum blonde color. Bleaching is not successful if done on hair that is too dark to begin with, because one (orange) hair pigment resists oxidation - thus dark hair will usually turn an undesired orange color. You should mainly consider bleaching your hair if it is naturally (dark) blonde, and you simply want a lighter shade.

Mixing ammonia with hydrogen peroxide is common in commercial products, and often done elsewhere to bleach hair quickly and cheaply. However, it is not recommended by hair professionals (those who don't understand chemistry but want your cash), and can cause extensive damage to hair (even causing it to fall out). Done by someone ignorant and inexperienced, it is likely to go wrong. It could be worth the extra money to buy reputable hair bleach - which still benefits from an experienced hairdresser to monitor the bleaching process. Even better, spend a lot and get your hair bleached at a salon. Using home made mixtures of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide could either save money, or result in a hair disaster.

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Mixing H2O2 and NH3 mixed under an ion of a metal will cause the H2O2 to decompose very rapidly, and, if there is a source of ignition, will cause the Hydrogen and Oxygen to recombine in the form of super heated steam.  So I would suggest doing this in an unreactive container (eg: Glass) in an ignition free environment.
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Anonymous answered
It can also go: H2O2+NH3=N2H4+2H2O. N2H4 is VERY toxic, even in such low concentrations as this, and even though it is susceptible to react with H2O. I cannot remember what process this is called, but it is a recognized hydrazine synthesis reaction.
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Anonymous
Anonymous commented
How do you get N2 when you only have one N to start with, and 6 Hs when you only start with 5???
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
It is the Pechiney-Ugine-Kuhlmann process : 2NH3 + H2O=H2N-NH2 + H2O
amber Jhon Profile
amber Jhon answered
When ammonia reacts with hydrogen peroxide, nitrogen, water and nitric oxides are formed. This reaction is an exothermic reaction.

Ammonia= NH4

Hydrogen peroxide = H2O2

Nitrogen = N2

Water = H2O

Nitric oxide= NO

The chemical equation is;

NH4 + H2O2 ------> N2 + H2O + NO

In this reaction oxygen gas and hydrogen gas are also produced as by-products. So, the small amount of oxygen and hydrogen will balance the reaction equation.
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Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Stability and reactivity : Violently oxidises organic material.
Decomposes at room temperature to other nitrogen oxides and nitrogen. Oxidises
in air to form nitrogen dioxide which is extremely reactive.
May react violently with reducing agents.
May react violently with combustible materials.

So mix at own risk.....
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Ask a chemist. My BA is in physical sciences but I know this:
(1) Ammonia is NH3. (Nitrogen has a valence of -3.)
(2) The equation you give doesn't balance.
(3) NO is nitric oxide, VERY toxic asphyxiant, not nitrous oxide (laughing gas, mildly toxic).
Do NOT try this at home, Amber22!! It's not ammonia and bleach, but not very different either.
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Is this the state of education today? These people don't even know that an equation has to balance. Oh, puhlease!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I used to do that rather frequently as one of the cheapest hypo cleaners for photographic uses consists of only these two chemicals.  I don't know what was happening inside but at least I'm still alive.

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