What Are The Branches Of Science And Define Each?

5 Answers

Connor Sephton Profile
Connor Sephton answered
There are three branches of what is referred to as "pure science" - underneath these main branches, which are, physical, earth, and life sciences, there are hundred of subtypes that deal with specialized science topics and subjects.

Three Branches Of Science And Their Definitions

• Physical - Physical science is the study of matter and energy; this type of scientific branch allows for a greater understanding of the tangible universe, as it relates to weight, volume, mass, and other common terms of measurement.
• Earth - This sort of earth science comprises the study of the planet, including its solar system and atmosphere.
• Life - With Life sciences, all living things are studied in microscopic detail; the inner processes and systems of living organisms are analyzed and classified according to the scientific method. The way animals, people, and other living organisms relate to one another is also a factor in Life science study.

Certain types of pure science have much in common with each other; in fact, all three branches may intersect during some subtypes of scientific research. For example, a microbiologist, or Life scientist, may use his knowledge of living organisms to benefit NASA (Earth science) space research regarding life on other planets. Often, chemical scientists and biologists will work with physicists (Physical science), combining their spheres of knowledge to make sweeping advancements in scientific study and research. The applications of pure sciences are used to cure and treat diseases; they may also be used to safeguard certain species, which may be endangered.

To learn more about the branches of science and their definitions, you can seek out online textbooks, tutorials, blogs, videos and podcasts relating to the three branches of pure science and their subcategories. For some, studying science becomes a passion and a lifelong career. Scientists save lives and improve the planet with their discoveries and applications.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Physics: The study of the behavior and properties of matter
Chemistry: The science of matter and its interactions with energy and itself  
Astronomy: The study of celestial objects in the universe
Oceanography: Study of the earth's oceans and their interlinked ecosystems and chemical and physical processes
Geology: The science of the Earth, its structure, and history  
Paleontology: The study of life-forms existing in former geological time periods
Meteorology: Study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting
Biology: The science that studies living organisms  
Zoology: The study of animals  
Medicine: The science concerned with maintaining health and restoring it by treating disease
John Wright Profile
John Wright answered
There are effectively four main branches of science - chemistry, physics, biology and maths. Each at some point will use some of the ideas of the other, although biology ideas don't usually occur very much in maths or physics.

Chemistry is concerned with the study of matter, the substances everything is made of. Every substance you know of is actually a chemical or mixture of chemicals - water, bread, iron, leather, glass, copper, you, everything. Chemists study how these different substances interact with each other and what their structure is. We often use instruments made by physicists to gather data on a substance.

Physists study forces acting on, motion of and forces interacting with substances. Some branches of physics are very mathematical, and the scientist in these cases is usually very skilled in both physics and maths.

Biologists study living things and their behaviour. Any plant, animal, fish, microbe, anything that is alive is fair game for biologists. They are also interested in the biochemical processes going on inside the living thing.

Anything with numbers interests mathematicians. They often provide the method of calculation used by a chemist, physicist or biologist to solve a problem. Some maths is so very weird it is almost impossible for anyone other than a mathematician to understand.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Physics – a natural science that studies the matter and its motion through space and time
Chemistry – a study of substances and the changes that they undergo
Mathematics – a study of quantity, structure, space and change
Earth Sciences – a study to build an understanding of how the Earth works
Social Sciences – fields outside natural sciences that study aspects of human societies
Life Sciences – scientific study of living organisms
Astronomy – study of celestial objects that originated from outside the Earth’s atmosphere
SWATHI KAMATH Profile
SWATHI KAMATH answered
Physics: The study of the behavior and properties of matter
Chemistry: The science of matter and its interactions with energy and itself 
Astronomy: The study of celestial objects in the universe
 Oceanography: Study of the earth's oceans and their interlinked ecosystems and chemical and physical processes
Geology: The science of the Earth, its structure, and history 
Paleontology: The study of life-forms existing in former geological time periods
Meteorology: Study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting
Biology: The science that studies living organisms 
 Zoology: The study of animals 
 
 
Medicine: The science concerned with maintaining health and restoring it by treating disease
 
 
 
 
 

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